A Short Analysis of “Bato sa Buhangin”

“Bato sa Buhangin” by ricsabastsax

By Edgar Lores

The Tagalog song, “Bato sa Buhangin” is a collaboration between composer Ernani Cuenco (1936 – 1988) and lyricist Roberto Nicolas Rigor (1946 – 2016).

The song has been covered by several singers and bands, notably Cinderella, Ogie Alcasid, Didith Reyes, and Mark Bautista.

Rigor, whose nickname is “Snaffu,” wrote many other hits such as “T.L. Ako sa ‘Yo;” “Bulag, Pipi at Bingi;” “Macho Gwapito;” “Mr. Dreamboy;” and “Boy, I Love You.”

Here is the song:

Verse:

Kapag ang puso’y natutong magmahal
Bawat tibok ay may kulay at buhay
Ngunit kung ang pagsuyo’y lilipas din
Bagay kaya ang bato sa buhangin?

Chorus:

Kay hirap unawain
Bawat damdamin
Pangakong magmahal hanggang libing
Sa langit may tagpuan din
At doon hihintayin
Itong bato sa buhangin

{Instrumental}

Ngunit kung ang pagsuyo’y lilipas din
Bagay kaya ang bato sa
… Buhangin

{Chorus}

Coda:

Bato sa Buhangin

***

Structurally, “Bato sa  Buhangin” is a simple song consisting of the traditional verse, chorus, and coda. The title appears at the end, rather than at the beginning, of each section.

The verse is a quatrain or a 4-line section, and the chorus is a sestet or a 6-line section. Each line of the quatrain is comprised of 11 syllables. In contrast, each line of the sestet varies in length from 5 to 10 syllables.  All in all, both verse and chorus are made up of almost an equal number of syllables: 44 for the verse and 45 for the chorus.  Such remarkable symmetry is not obvious, and one wonders in admiration at the effort to achieve it.

The rhyming scheme of the verse is AXBB.  And that of the chorus BBXBBB.

The themes of the song are essentially about heartbreak, marriage, death, and endless love.

One imagines the songwriter, at day’s end, pondering on the frailty of love after a breakup with a loved one or after receiving a Dear John email.

He asks, “Is affection worth the bother?” although, of course, in more poetic language.

It is noteworthy that the writer uses the word “pagsuyo” rather than the traditional “pagibig.” While the word “pagsuyo” has been translated here as affection, it can take on the meaning of petting.

As such, the term is ambiguous as it can refer to a groping kind of love or a gentle love. The ambiguity is further heightened in that affection can be a prelude to romantic love or its postlude. We all are familiar with the excitement of love in its first stages. But only a few of us are fortunate to reach that last stage, when the fires of love have turned to glowing embers, and in our significant other we find both a lover and a friend.

The song is written in the third-person limited voice, and is devoid of pronouns. In using this perspective, the writer lifts the experience of heartache that love often brings from the personal realm, implied in the verse, into the universal realm of suffering, implied in the chorus. We all have experienced this pain.

There are two central tropes. The first is in the enigmatic phrase “bato sa buhangin.” This is not an idiomatic phrase. It literally translates as “stone on sand.” What is powerful about the metaphor is that the word “bato” assumes two forms. In the verse, it is used as a verb, and in the chorus as a noun.

In the verse, the writer asks, “If affection fades, is it worth our while to cast or “throw” (bato) our luck on the shifting sands of time?” Sand is a well-used symbol, and it can signify the passage of time, impermanence, or possibility.

Then in the chorus, the writer speculates that we may catch the “stone” (bato) we ventured to throw.

This brings us to the second central metaphor, that of heaven and earth. The verse occurs on earth. In the first couplet, each heartbeat is described as full of intensity (kulay) and vivacity (buhay) when the heart learns to love. In the second couplet, the writer asks the haunting question about the infirmity of love.

Moving on to the chorus, we note that the first three lines still find us on earth, with the first couplet capturing the plaint of lovers troubled with their feelings, which are hard, if not impossible, to make sense of.

The third line is the start of a pivot that brings us, despite our doubts, to our exchange of marital vows to embrace each other “in sickness and in health until death do us part.”

The fourth line is a volta, a full pivot that shifts us into heaven. It gives us the reassurance lovers will meet again. The last two lines return us to the first metaphor. They affirm the possibility our earthly vows may come full circle in heaven, and that the daring cast of the dice we made on earth will at last find full fruition.

Love is no longer within the realm of time but timeless, no longer ephemeral but eternal.

 

Comments
95 Responses to “A Short Analysis of “Bato sa Buhangin””
  1. Wilfredo G. Villanueva says:

    Thanks, Edgar. Love is right down my alley, as you know. It’s good that science (you) and sentiment (me) can merge. I don’t know the musical terms but I waded through them, just like in a flood, because I wanted to reach the crescendo, which was your conclusion. I wasn’t disappointed. Love will sail through all winds, all seas and terrian, and it will still be the same love, even stronger and with more oomph, heartfelt. Love is never distant, it is just working its way into the hearts of lovers, the hearts of parent and child, from saint to downtrodden (Saint Teresa of Calcutta), patriot to beloved country, God to his people. Thank you, Professor.

    • edgar lores says:

      *******
      Will, you’re most welcome. This is for incurable romantics like you — and me.
      *****

      • NHerrera says:

        Count me into your and Wil’s club of incurable romantics. Can we count Joe as a member of the club as he lounges in the beach with San Mig in hand as he expounds to Junior the beauty of love of nature and the birds and the bees?

      • andy ibay says:

        I hope I will be forgiven to make singit or yabang but for the purpose of making info in salience to other meanings in Bato sa Buhangin. In February 1960 I was accepted as soil surveyor and this I what they taught us about the morphology and genesis of soils. Soils are products of weathering taking long as hundred of years to form from rocks which are of three kinds: igneous rocks coming from volcanic lava (molten magma locally known as adobe), sedimentary rocks formed from sand and mineral sediments (most commoly known as sandstone (batong buhay) and metamorphic rocks (marble) hardest of the three.

        There are many other kinds of rocks not taught us because of their lesser importance to soil fertility and agriculture. I was lucky to be volunteer first resident provincial soils in-charge of Romblon Province, with Romblon island claimed to have bigger marble deposits than Italy (don’t know now). At the time a big white or gray color marble table bar etched with your name and position title will cost you Five Pesos, the smaller one, Three Pesos only.

        Anyway, knowing partly the science of “bato” provide some idea about other matters like the Makati Parking Building could have been constructed in the middle of the Pasig River without spending much on foundation because underneath is adobe, strong molten magma, igneous rock slightly weaker than Quezon City’s escumbro rock. QC should built up (bato sa ilalim) towards the sky while Manila (lambot burak ang ilalim) should go subway for transport and underground mini cities.

        Having been be assigned In Romblon (said to have more than 10 islands) I got a collection of buhangin of many colors from light to dark gray, to orange, to red and pure white sand, hence the term red and white beaches. I learned the color of beach sands had something to do with pulverize colorful corals over centuries. Bato sa buhangin or batong buhangin has something to do with batong buhay. No wonder that big ones are seen scattered more along level beaches than on cliffs and embankments. But inland and mountain streams smaller sandstones are seen down streams. Starting big from headwaters or up streams over long years of flooding the stones are said to decrease in size.

        I will not guess the kind of rocks preferred by mermaids for sunbathing. Better ask the Jezebels. Edna Luna petite actress who appeared as mermaid Jezebel in a Tagalog movie came from mahabang baybay (Long Beach) in Romblon.

        At the time, there was a carbon copy of Armi Kuusela the first Miss Universe in Odiongan, Tablas Island, Romblon. Don’t asked me about tuba, harana and romance in Tablas Island.

        • karlgarcia says:

          Many thanks for all the things you shared with us.

        • edgar lores says:

          *******
          Andy, fascinating details. I remember igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks from Geology 101. In Oz, sandstone was used by the early convicts to build government buildings. I like the term “batong buhay.” I imagine these are the large dark solid boulders we see on some beaches and which seem to be preferred by sunbathing mermaids.


          *****

        • Joe America says:

          Hi, Andy. I want to make sure you caught the recent reader comment at one of your articles. https://joeam.com/2016/05/29/building-a-philippine-parliament-and-federalism/

          • andy ibay says:

            got it, thanks joeam.

          • andy ibay says:

            I already started the process of compiling my poems into a book temporarily titled AMIHAN, HABAGAT and BUHANGIN, like to donate copies to libraries of our public schools, even as E book or paperback/clothbound. Don’t be surprised if you read your pen names or handles there with your comments on my postings JoeAm and your really Hon members of the Society. Sue me if you like for whatever, I am long ready to spend my last years or days anywhere.

            • andy ibay says:

              Aargh, BUHAWI, NOT BUHANGIN; darn the title should be AMIHAN, HABAGAT and BUHAWI the tagalog for the NorthEast and NorthWest Monsoons and baby Tornado. New Orleans has its KATRINA and many more devastating beauties from the Atlantic. Amihan wet kisses your face, Habagat gives you Pacquiao’s flurry of stinging punches. Buhawi is sexy Hot, hot ipo-ipo.

              • edgar lores says:

                *******
                Andy, I was going to say – wind and sand. Now, it’s all wind and rain. I imagine the poems will be passionate and full of fury. But the poems will be in English, right?
                *****

              • andy ibay says:

                Yeah Edgar L in English it is, might have enough for a tagalog collection too. The work could be deeply flawed as it was done by an old dog now almost 80 trying to learn new tricks like poetry and painting. Self censored too, as it already excluded one titled PIRANHAS about Pinoy politicians.

            • karlgarcia says:

              It will be a treasure.You remind me of my dad who is typing his memoirs.
              I would like to say that I was touched by the comment Joe linked,sorry I clicked it,your acknowledging his dad was very much appreciated by him.

        • chempo says:

          Andy thanks geology 101. I studied geography which touched only a bit on geology, and that little now long forgotten. The only Rock I know now is this.

          Power of media over the classrooms. It’s bad.

          • andy ibay says:

            Our rock was different: The ROCK of yesteryears; teeny-boopers, the rock even of Liz Taylor turned out a really loving gay Rock of a river in the Big Apple. Rock Hudson was Apache Warrior in the film Winchester 73?

        • andy ibay says:

          In the Romblon town Catholic Church plaza when 6pm church bells ring for oracion and you did not stop to pray, the parish priests will boom shout at you to stop and pray from his perched in the bell fry. It took me a whole day to bike around the entire Romblon island town capital. that was early 1960, 56 years ago. Against typhoons, the Romblon harbor is the safest hiding place for ships in all of Asia. As a 23 yr old fresh graduate my heart and head swelled with pride to be the Provincial Soil Technologist of islands of honesty. Ah Memories of no corruption and no illegal drugs days. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDaIdf07vMY

    • David Murphy says:

      How do I love thee. Let me count the ways. I love thee to the depth and height and breadth my soul can reach….I love thee with all the breath, smiles, tears of all my life and, if God chooses, I will but love thee better afterr death.” Elizabeth Barrett Browning Songs from the Portugese Sonet 43

      • edgar lores says:

        *******
        David,

        That last line of the Browning sonnet does indeed capture the central idea of the song. Thank you.
        *****

  2. karlgarcia says:

    I love the music.

    on the ping backs below,the author said he thought this article was about Bato dela Rosa.

    Life is like a box of chocolates,you will only know what you are going to get,if you are looking.

  3. karlgarcia says:

    I was thinking of the Lito Lapid and Nora Aunor movie,but realized that was Kastilyong Buhangin,with the theme sung by Basil.

    • edgar lores says:

      *******
      Karl, Kastilyong Buhangin, or sandcastles, is part of the symbolism about the impermanence of sand. I love Basil’s rendition of that song.
      *****

      • karlgarcia says:

        Minsan ang ‘sang pangako’y maihahambing
        Sa isang kastilyong buhangin,
        Sakdal-rupok at huwag di masaling
        Guguho sa ihip ng hangin

        Ang alon ng maling pagmamahal
        Ang s’yang kalaban n’yang mortal,
        Kapag dalampasiga’y nahagkan
        Ang kastilyo ay nabubuwal

        Kayat bago nating bigkasin ang pagsintang sumpa
        Sa minumutya, sa diwa’t gawa,
        Pakaisipin naitn kung pag-ibig ay wagas
        Kahit pa magsanga ng landas

        Minsan dalawang puso’y nagsumpaan
        Pag-ibig na walang hanggan,
        Sumpang kastilyong buhangin pala
        Pag-ibig na pansamantala.

        Kayat bago nating bigkasin ang pagsintang sumpa
        Sa minumutya, sa diwa’t gawa,
        Pakaisipin naitn kung pag-ibig ay wagas
        Kahit pa magsanga ng landas

        Minsan dalawang puso’y nagsumpaan
        Pag-ibig na walang hanggan,
        Sumpang kastilyong buhangin pala
        Pag-ibig na
        Pansamantala, luha ang dala
        ‘Yan ang pag-ibig na nangyari sa atin,
        Gumuhong kastilyong buhangin.

        • edgar lores says:

          *******
          Karl,

          As I look over and compare both songs, I find that both are excellently written.

          Kastilyong Buhangin (KB) is a real ballad consisting of 4 quatrains. The third quatrain is the chorus, although one might include the fourth quatrain as part of it. The second repetition of the fourth quatrain resolves into the coda that begins with “luha ang dala…”

          The rhyming scheme of the first quatrain is ABAB and that of the chorus is AABB.

          Unlike Bato sa Buhangin (BsB), which is very compact, KB is narrative and expository. It is written in the third-person voice and contains such pronouns as “nating” and “natin.”

          BsB is positive and affirms true love whereas KB does not. Indeed, KB warns us to be careful of pledging it as love is often like a sandcastle, which will be demolished by the first wave.

          All in all, I find BsB more lyrical and soothing in both lyrics and in melody.
          *****

  4. josephivo says:

    Of topic, a must read on hunger in the Philippines and the economic consequences.

    https://i.stci.uk/sites/default/files/Cost%20of%20Hunger%20Philippines_FINAL_23August2016.pdf

    • edgar lores says:

      *******
      Joseph, thanks for this alarming report. This one statistic got me:

      “In 2013, 32.6 million (53%) of working-age Filipinos (15 to 64 years old) had suffered from undernutrition (stunting) when they were less than five years old. This means that more than half of the working-age population had a higher risk of mortality and lower educational attainment and economic productivity.”
      *****

    • NHerrera says:

      Good report filled with statistics and implications for the future. Gives valuable recommendations too.

      The report implies it but a Philippine economist — I forgot his name — commented about the children’s malnutrition in some such words as “there goes our demographic sweet spot for development even if the population drastically tapers off; the productivity of these children grown by then to contribute to economy goes kaput.”

  5. chempo says:

    Edgar, if this were an exam piece, I’ll give you an “A” for Literature. If you don’t mind my saying, in Literature we would have titled this “An appreciation of Bato Sa Buhangin”. But then, as Will said it, you’re a Science man, so “Analysis” it is.

    • edgar lores says:

      *******
      Chempo, Point taken. In fact, I have patterned the title of the essay from articles on a website dedicated to literature. They often entitle their interpretations of poems as, “A Short Analysis of…”

      https://interestingliterature.com/

      Thank you for the “A,” Professor.
      *****

  6. allan reyes says:

    When I read the 3rd and 4th line of the verse, what came to my mind or what I had imagined Rigor had in his mind was the sand like those in Boracay forming a seeming unendless, smooth, “seamless” stretch before it meets the sea. So, a stone looks like a glitch, an “awkward” presence in a sea of sand. Like a heartache or a lost love in a trouble-free life..But then, in the Chorus, it seems he’s still pining for the lost love, hence he’s hoping to meet her in heaven and there probably have another chance? He now becomes the “bato” and the girl, the “sand”. Just a thought.

    • edgar lores says:

      *******
      Allan,

      I like the imagery of a stretch of sand marred by a largish rock. You equate the rock not exactly to a girl, but more to the “awkward” memory of a heartache caused by a girl to the songwriter. Then in heaven, he becomes the rock, not as an obstacle, but as a boulder of strength, surrounded by sand… which stands for the love of the girl (?).

      Your interpretation works. And yours is the honor of the first alternative reading of the song.

      The beauty of songs and poems is that they are subject to different interpretations. Any reading is colored by the subjective experience of the reader. And your reading of the “seamless” sand in the verse as representative of a trouble-free life is attractive.
      *****

    • sonny says:

      When matter and form come together as a dynamic unity as in BATO SA BUHANGIN, meaning, interpretation, resonance vets the literary or musical composition to become a classic in the genre or subgenre. ‘BATO …’ was the first post-Kundiman (‘60s) song that intrigued and challenged me (a choral setting) to sing. Back then, I found BATO to be unusually short, poetic (pivots around imagery & open metaphor) and initially a bear to sing but quite pleasing in the end. Up till then for me, singing Tagalog songs necessarily meant doing so along Kundiman as the ‘carrier’ medium (melody & content).

      I found this description somewhere a long time ago. For contrast:

      “Kundiman is a unique musical form expressing intense longing, caring, devotion and oneness with a beloved, or with a child, spiritual figure, motherland, ideal or cause. According to its text a kundiman could be romantic, patriotic, religious, mournful or a consolation, a lullaby, or a protest and other types. But whatever the type, its music is soulful and lofty and conveying deep feelings of devotional love. The authentic kundiman inspires a selfless spiritual attitude.

      The emotion captured by the kundiman is one of affectionate probing, exploring, sensing and empathizing with the object of love and devotion, be it a person, community, country, spiritual symbol, or ideal.

      The kundiman songwriter, singer and listener become involved in an essentially dynamic, everflowing, creatively transforming and living process.”

      • edgar lores says:

        ******
        Quite a lyrical description of the kundiman. It is fitting.

        The kundiman has reached operatic heights.

        This is the Visayan kundiman “Matud Nila” sung by a Japanese baritone:


        *****

        • sonny says:

          Edgar, it is always satisfying to read when someone points out the poetry in a song masterfully as you did. Much appreciated as always, kabsat.

  7. karlgarcia says:

    The cumulative wear and tear through the wavy centuries makes bato into buhangin.But when you want construction materials asap,you just need a cement mixer.

  8. karlgarcia says:

    Like sands in the hourglass,so are the days of our lives.

    • edgar lores says:

      *******
      LLJohnson, Agree! As performed in my favorite rendition, by Yolly Samson of the Cinderella band, it is a soft ballad of the late ’70s.
      *****

  9. karlgarcia says:

    I wanted to post the youtube video of the song,so We could at least hear the audio and sing along (it has lyrics)

  10. Bing Garcia says:

    Many investors see Duterte as the Philippines’ Lee Kuan Yew.

  11. James Sia says:

    Sometime lurker here, though I kinda miss the political posts. Hehe. As someone who enjoys music, I appreciate the heads up. Thanks Ed, Imma check this song out in a bit. Shout-out to Joe too, thanks for answering my email!

  12. andy ibay says:

    It isn’t much of thought been thinking to post or not for three days now but can’t shake off the image of the crying father so grief stricken so angry so helpless and powerless to kill for his son the image of a mother crying too a mother Madonna wailing looking ugly and dirty in poverty so heart rending it could burst your heart if you don’t belong to the correctly proper elite and if you are an old wannabe apolitical caring for people any kind of people like the Harijans the untouchables of Metro Manila their images haunts your balintataw before losing consciousness to sleep hoping the itay-inay images don’t wake you up before daybreak itay saying bakit kami bakit kami lang ang pinapatay inay wailing Oo na Oo na nga nagawa naming yan para meron kaming pambili ng pagkain sabi ko naman bakit nga ba kung si itay at inay maaring pamilya eskwater pero kung metro aide ni Imelda nagpatuloy meron malinis na t-shirt at pulang pantalon, merong dangal sa minimum wage trabaho maghapon baka sakali mga anak hindi naging bangag sa droga meron bisyong high na may atik pa sa tulak at kolekta anak ng tinapa mga konyo bakit nawala ang mga metro aide sa dami ng ekonomista mga PhD pa ganda ng mga putang programa di alam kung gaano karaming trabaho magagawa taon-taon badyet ng gobierno di alam di naman mga gago puro dada di alam ekonomiks ay agham ng walang hanggan walang katapusang takaw sa rangya at yaman ng sangkatauhan (insatiability of human wants science of wealth getting) dapat lang trabaho umisip ng trabaho para may pinagpawisan pambili ng pagkain ilan na ba ang napapatay sa droga na kamaganak ng mga OFW walang tigil ang padala ng pera di alam ng mga gago simpleng metro aide kaysa nakawin ang pasweldo BAKA sakaling matibay na kalasag sa droga na abot kaya para makalimutan ang kahirapan pero para sa mayaman OKEY LANG kasi may pambili ng droga buhay pa nasa langit na puede nang mamatay sa overdose at hindi sa bala kung si itay at si inay pumapalahaw sa galit at pighati ay tulad ko nakapagaral baka mas mahaba kaysa dito sa basurang sinulat ko na hindi politika kundi basura sasabihin ni itay at inay hoy mga gago sabi ni palikerong bill Clinton it is the economy stupid it is economics dumbo hindi po politika pabrika po at taga linis ng kalsada at mga oficina hindi po mga sikyu at seksi salesgirl sa mga mall mga metro aide po at janitor trabaho para sa mga eskwater na di puedeng mag OFW ang takbuhan po ng kulang palad meron ng kita mantak mo para pang nasa langit kahit di pa naka tsibug.

    • andy ibay says:

      Ang buhay ng mahirap bagkos libong mahirap kaysa sa may pera nagtitiyaga basahin ang nakasulat sa itaas. Pero sa mga basurero ng Smokey Mountain, Payatas at iba pang tambakan kahit basura napaghihiwalay na sosort out for re-cycle, may kunting halaga rin. That I will try to do to sort out the garbage in the post above baka meron KATUTURAN. Gusto kong eh post yung video ni itay at inay TV PATROL yata baka nakita rin ng taga rito, mahirap eh post mahaba kasi ang mga balita.

      • andy ibay says:

        heto baka mas madaling basahin pero mahirap pa rin eh sort out eh. Palpak.

        To post or not to post
        It isn’t much of thought been thinking to post
        or not for three days now but can’t shake off the image
        of the crying father so grief stricken so angry
        so helpless and powerless to kill
        for his dead son

        the image of a mother crying too
        a mother Madonna wailing looking ugly and dirty
        in poverty so heart rending it could burst your heart
        if you don’t belong to the correctly proper elite
        and if you are an old wannabe apolitical caring for people
        any kind of people like the Harijans

        the untouchables of Metro Manila their images haunts
        your balintataw before losing consciousness to sleep
        hoping the itay-inay images don’t wake you up before daybreak
        itay saying bakit kami bakit kami lang ang pinapatay
        inay wailing Oo na Oo na nga nagawa naming yan
        para meron kaming pambili ng pagkain

        sabi ko naman bakit nga ba kung si itay at inay
        maaring pamilya eskwater pero kung metro aide ni Imelda
        nagpatuloy meron silang malinis na t-shirt at pulang pantalon,
        merong dangal sa minimum wage trabaho maghapon
        baka sakali mga anak hindi naging bangag sa droga
        meron bisyong high na may atik pa sa tulak at kolekta

        anak ng tinapa mga konyo bakit nawala ang mga metro aide
        sa dami ng ekonomista mga PhD pa ganda
        ng mga putang programa di alam
        kung gaano karaming trabaho magagawa taon-taon
        badyet ng gobierno di alam dagdag trabaho
        di naman mga gago puro dada di alam ekonomiks ay agham
        ng walang hanggan walang katapusang takaw sa rangya
        at yaman ng sangkatauhan (insatiability of human wants
        science of wealth getting) dapat lang trabaho umisip ng trabaho

        para may pinagpawisan pambili ng pagkain
        ilan na ba ang napapatay sa droga hindi ba kuni lang
        na kamaganak ng mga OFW walang tigil ang padala ng pera
        di alam ng mga gago simpleng metro aide
        kaysa nakawin ng mga korap ang pasweldo

        BAKA sakaling matibay na kalasag sa droga na abot kaya
        para makalimutan ang sakit tiyan ng gutom at kahirapan
        pero para sa mayaman OKEY LANG kasi
        may pambili ng droga buhay pa sila parang nasa langit na
        puede nang mamatay sa overdose at hindi sa bala
        kung si itay at si inay pumapalahaw sa galit at pighati

        ay tulad ko nakapagaral baka mas mahaba kaysa dito
        sa basurang sinulat ko na hindi politika kundi basura
        sasabihin ni itay at inay hoy mga gago
        sabi ni palikerong bill Clinton it is the economy stupid
        it is economics dumbo hindi po politika pabrika po at taga linis
        ng kalsada at mga oficina hindi po mga sikyu at seksi salesgirl
        sa mga mall mga metro aide po at janitor
        trabaho para sa mga eskwater na di puedeng mag OFW

        ang takbuhan po ng kulang palad meron ng kita mantak mo
        feeling para pang nasa langit kahit di pa naka tsibug

        hoy ano nga ba talaga ang binhi naging ugat malalim ng droga
        sosyal ba politika ba o kaya ekonomiks daw o
        katangahan o kapabayaan ba?

      • edgar lores says:

        *******
        Andy, there’s enough sorrow going around. No need to post the video.
        *****

    • edgar lores says:

      *******
      Andy, you’ve gone stream of consciousness on us. Seems fitting in the confused current milieu… but yours is a lamentation, a cry from the heart.
      *****

      • andy ibay says:

        Edgar L your first comment reminds me of my former immediate boss Sr. Soil Technologist Mario de la Paz who in 1965 stressed to me in Tagalog as we do our work the cliché : Mabuti pa ang loko-loko nagagamot ang TANGA walang gamot. Naisip ko sa Ingles It is good or better to be mad, crazy or insane there is a cure but none for an idiot, moron or retardate. Katangahan o katakawan (walang kabusugan)? Pareho yata walang gamot eh.

        • edgar lores says:

          *******
          Andy, there is a cure. Goodwill, curiosity, and the effort to better one’s self. Of the three, I think the first is the greater.
          *****

          • andy ibay says:

            Edgar L, If I may

            I wasn’t born dirt poor, born when Itay was senior law student. But I am the inevitable captive of my DNA, my education, training and experiences and old age. Goodwill is the luxury available only to the elite in money and a modicum of power which is hopefully expected from them by the poor. The poor has none to give but servility and loyalty in return for goodwill. There are those who have who care not give or expect goodwill from others. They are the by standers. In other times and other climes they are considered philosophers.

            • andy ibay says:

              Edgar L If I may beg to elucidate but really not differ . . .
              Easier to read in short lines, here it is

              I wasn’t born dirt poor,
              born when Itay was senior law student.
              But I am the inevitable captive of my DNA, my education,
              training and experiences and old age.

              Goodwill is the luxury available only to the elite
              in money and a modicum of power
              which is hopefully expected from them by the poor.

              The poor has none to give but servility and loyalty
              in return for goodwill.
              There are those who have yet they care not give
              or expect goodwill from others.
              They are the by standers. In other times and other climes
              they are considered philosophers.

              • andy ibay says:

                A Bystander

                I am a bystander.
                I can never write a poem,
                much more be a poet.

                I am a bystander.
                Because writing is not in my genes,
                I can not say anger is my engine
                Nor hatred my sword.

                I am a bystander.
                My heart yearns but beat it will not
                to say beauty is in the flower, cry it will
                not that joy flows from my tears.

                I am a bystander
                Cold spectator, neither deaf nor blind but mute
                like a fence sitter, silenced by events surrounding
                pain and oppression, I am numbed by cowardice.

                To be brave is to be Sisyphus, pushing that rock
                of a poem, heavy with pretensions, mediocre,
                laughable. Like the three monkeys Sisyphus has no clue
                of the coming revolution.

                A bystander ever will I be, unless changed
                by courage writing a piece more powerful than this.
                Emboldened by pen attacking tyrants
                I shall be a bystander no more.

                November 25, 2004, 10:00 am – Thursday Thanksgiving Day
                New Jersey USA Posted in JoeAm’s Society September 14, 2016
                While vacationing in NJ USA,

              • edgar lores says:

                *******
                Andy, thanks. From a bystander to Sartre’s engaged man.
                *****

              • edgar lores says:

                *******
                Andy, it is remarkable how versification alters perception.
                *****

  13. andy ibay says:

    could be in another place up there ,,,, these stanzas

    To be brave is to be Sisyphus, pushing that rock
    of a poem, heavy with pretensions, mediocre,
    laughable. Like the three monkeys Sisyphus has no clue
    of the coming revolution.

    Hah, hah, hah, hah just added these lines to make yabang
    Sisyphus was nobody, but he learned Death coming for him
    This Sisyphus did not like and killed Death but was punished
    By the Gods with a rock up a mountain forever to be
    Poets’ and Writers’ myth, their bread’s timeless fountain.

  14. Gay Tordesillas says:

    Very good analysis. Bravo!

  15. Fred says:

    I really love this song that’s why I searched for the wonderful meaning of it. It’s a thorough explanation. Thanks “Author”!

  16. I was wanting to ask where will I find bato de la rosa in buhangin but that is not nice. I might be misunderstood as ” feeling romantic” hahaha (remember some incurables are on the terminal stage?) Thanks, Edgar for a brief shift from the D syndrome most of us are suffering. We will keep coming back for more Rx for mental catharsis here …some supernatural journey, soul music analysis, etc.

  17. edgar lores says:

    *******
    Marlene, surprise!
    *****

  18. edgar lores says:

    *******
    Victoria,

    Ouch! You make the point that the young ‘uns in their second stage of childhood are incurably romantic… and not just incurable.

    Indeed, we need a break from the doom and gloom. Here, in the lounges of the library of The Society, one can find solace in the exploration of ideas, in the beauty of songs and poetry, in the soothing music, and in the imaginary cup of tea. Or just in the silence from the outside world.
    *****

  19. andy ibay says:

    sometimes you find romance in a name as you Shake (your) Speare; , sometimes it’s irony and whatever: like a rose made of stone, rose hard as stone, stone of the rose; a one-star petals of stone, stone grown roses; Rosetta stone, roses grown in dug rocks in Banton island of stone in Romblon. pasintabi po, di po sinasadya.

  20. edgar lores says:

    *******
    Andy, wonderful poetic word association — rosebud.
    *****

  21. andy ibay says:

    thanks Edgar L

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